• Knee
    Arthroscopy
  • ACL
    Reconstruction
  • ACL Reconstruction with
    Allografts and LARS Ligaments
  • Acute
    Knee Injury Clinic
  • Partial
    Knee Replacement
  • Knee
    Replacement
  • Hip Replacement &
    Resurfacing
  • Skiing and
    Snowsports
  • Revision Knee
    Replacement
  • Revision Hip
    Replacement
  • Anterior Minimally
    Invasive Hip Replacement
  • Computer
    Assisted Surgery

Hip Conditions & Procedures

Anatomy of Hip

The hip is a large ball-and-socket joint with freedom of movement in six directions. Hip conditions and osteoarthritis are common.

Arthroscopy of the Hip

Prof Waller no longer does hip arthroscopy. Patients requiring hip arthroscopy are referred to a trusted colleague in Sydney

Labral Tears & FAI

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint with six directions of movement.

Gluteus Medius Tears

Gluteus medius is one of 3 muscles in the buttocks and is situated on the outer surface of the hip. The gluteus medius assists with abduction of the hip and also stabilises the hip during the stance (weight bearing) phase of gait.

Trochanteric Bursitis

The hip has two large bursae. Bursae are jelly-like sacs located throughout the body that are positioned between bones and soft tissue to reduce friction.

Hip Replacement

Hip Replacement Surgery involves the replacement of the worn out ball and socket joint with new implants.

Hip Replacement Surgery

Hip replacement has recently been described by the prestigious British medical journal The Lancet as the ‘operation of the century’, due to its tremendously high success and patient satisfaction rates.

Anterior Approach hip replacement

Anterior approach hip replacement is a method of inserting the artificial joint through the front (ie. anterior) without cutting any muscles or nerves. Anterior hip replacement is a minimally invasive procedure.

Dual Mobility Hip Replacement

Dual Mobility Hip Replacement is a high performance hip replacement implant that is more complex than standard hip replacements.

Hip Arthritis

The hip joint can become worn-out most commonly as a result of osteoarthritis but may also result from other causes such as trauma, infection or other diseases.

Hip Resurfacing Surgery

Hip Resurfacing is a procedure that:

  • replaces the hip socket and
  • resurfaces (reshapes) the damaged areas at the top of the thigh bone (femoral head).

It is an alternative to Total Hip Replacement (THR).

Partial Hip Replacement

Partial Hip Replacement also called hip hemiarthroplasty, is a surgical procedure where only the femoral head (the ball) of the damaged hip joint is replaced. It is occasionally used for treatment of fractures in the elderly but is not used for the treatment of osteoarthritis.

Revision Hip Replacement Surgery

If an artificial hip joint wears out or loosens from the bone, revision of part or all of the prosthetic components may be required. Modern cementless hip replacement implants with ceramic, titanium and third generation polyethylene components are much less likely to require revision than first or second generation cemented metal and plastic hips.

Click on the topics below to find out more from the Orthopaedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  • St Vincent's Hospital Sydney
  • Macquarie University Hospital
  • Australian Orthopaedic Association
  • The Royal College of Surgeond of Edinburgh
  • Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
  • The Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland
  • Sydney University Football Club
  • Bulldogs
  • Cronulla Sharks
  • Moximed